Subito Music Distributors

Below is the site for my published compositions.

 

Also are links to performances of some of my works.

Waking, Shepherd University - Mark Andrew Cook
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Waking, Manhattan School of Music - Mark Andrew Cook
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Waking, A Song Cycle for Soprano and Piano

A setting of four poems by Appalachian Poet Ron Rash from the eponymously titled volume.

Composed for, and premiered by, Soprano Lawren Diana Hill Palmer and accompanied by Dr. Robert Scott Beard

The first track is a recording of the premiere at Shepherd University in fulfillment of the WVMTA Composer of the Year commission. The second track is a performance at the Manhattan School of Music.

Piano Sonata No. 1 "The Changeling" - Mark Andrew Cook
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Composed for Jason Solounias (DMA Piano, Catholic University) and premiered on his undergraduate senior recital, the sonata employs improvisation as a constructivistic component.  It is challenging technically as well.  Jason, a remarkable musician, also performed the work at the 2010 Mid-Atlantic College Music Society Conference and the 2011 Society of Composers National Conference.

Sonata No. 1 for Piano "The Changeling"

I have been asked occasionally as to origin of the subtitle of the Sonata, “The Changeling.”  Well, it is not a reference to the Star Trek TOS episode No. 37 of the same name featuring “NOMAD.”  (Oh dear, I’ve given away my guilty secret that I am a closet Trek Nerd...).  Nor is it in any way related to that atrocious 1980’s movie that not even the magnificent George C. Scott could save!

Rather, it has to do with the origins of the source material for the piece.  Years ago, I listened to an episode of Peter Schickele’s radio program wherein he spoke specifically about his string quartet, and generally about how and from where he “extracted” materials from seemingly disparate musical/stylistic repertoire, and incorporated this into his own music, albeit modified to suit his own “twist.”  I was fascinated.  The ‘cello obligato example he used was in reality a simplistic boogie-woogie left-hand piano pattern!  “Works for me,” I thought.


In my misspent youth, I invested some fruitless years playing what is now called “Prog Rock”  (now it has had a fashionable resurgence and, even more irritating, I’m far too old and “dignified” to play it).  The source materials for the Sonata are adapted from the eponymously titled piece from those dark days. I pray that this information does not ruin your perception and possible enjoyment of the work!